Category: Design

NYT Talks Lighting Design, But Not With Lighting Designers

Sometimes the New York Times is oblivious and yesterday was one of them.  In an article titled Lighting a Room, Simplified the author wrote about the importance of lighting in the home.  In preparing the article, she spoke to and quoted four interior designers, one fixture manufacturers and  one professional lighting designer.  In addition, all eight of the photos in the article are taken during the day, so they're nice illustrations of the use of windows and daylight in residential interiors but terrible illustrations of electric lighting, which is the topic of the article.  They seem to  be marketing photos for particular lighting fixtures, not examples of good lighting.

David Zinn's SpongeBob Costumes

Our friend and classmate David Zinn designed the costumes and scenery for "SpongeBob SquarePants: The Broadway Musical."  David's designs have been nominated for Tony Awards, and his costumes were profiled in Friday's New York Times.  Congratulations David!

EU Proposes Ban on Incandescent Lamps in Theatres

The Stage reported yesterday that "The European Union is considering banning tungsten halogen lamps in entertainment lighting, due to environmental concerns over their energy inefficiency."  There are so many reasons this is hopelessly misguided.  Let me list a few.

Building Target Margin Theatre

Earlier this year we started working with New York's Target Margin Theater on converting a two story warehouse into a new studio theatre, rehearsal spaces, and office space.  Two acoustically isolated rehearsal rooms were built at the beginning of the summer.  When bids for the resilient stage floor were twice as high as expected the team decided that TMT could build it themselves.

On A Site Survey

Yesterday we surveyed a site in D.C. for a possible new Vapiano restaurant.  The NYC flagship renovation begins soon, and a new location opens in Chicago later this year, all with lighting design by Studio T+L.

How Bright Are Colored LEDs?

Measuring and describing the brightness of colored LEDs is an increasingly important part of a lighting designer’s practice. They are used more often, and in more types of projects, than ever before. Yet, we don’t have an accurate method for understanding exactly how much light is being produced and how bright it will appear. It’s a problem that the lighting industry needs to solve, and soon.

LEDs In Stage Lighting

In a project meeting yesterday a team member said that LED stage lights would save the owner money.  While there are many reasons to include LED lights in a theatre's equipment inventory, cost savings is not one of them.  We've written a white paper, LEDs In Stage Lighting, that includes an economic analysis and simple rate of return.  Get a copy here.

Design Is A Process, Not Just A Product

I often tell my students that design is as much a process as it is a product. Even so, they (and some of my clients) sometimes want to go from first meeting to finished design in one step. I suppose one could do that, but the result wouldn’t be a thoughtfully appropriate design, it would just be fixture selection. The difference lies in the early part of the design process where we gather information about the project and the expectations of the stakeholders, followed by an analysis of that information towards the stated goals of the project. Only after completing those two critical steps can we begin the work of putting the design together and executing it. Here’s one way of looking at the entire process.

What Happened to IYL?

Elizabeth Donoff asks "International Year of What?" in her editorial in this month's Architectural Lighting, and I have to agree with her.  Early last year I noted that our professional organizations showed no plans to take advantage of the International Year of Light, and indeed nothing worth mentioning happened.  The professional societies of the lighting community (IES, IALD, etc.) added the International Year of Light logo to their web sites, but that's about all.  They held no significant events, published no important documents, and made no efforts to raise the visibility of the profession with potential employers (architects and owners) or with the public at large.  The IALD boasts that their regularly scheduled events were added to the IYL calendar, but say nothing as to what resulted, probably because the result was nothing.  Lightfair 2015 was business as usual, I saw no recognition of IYL.

1