Category: Lighting design

NYT Talks Lighting Design, But Not With Lighting Designers

Sometimes the New York Times is oblivious and yesterday was one of them.  In an article titled Lighting a Room, Simplified the author wrote about the importance of lighting in the home.  In preparing the article, she spoke to and quoted four interior designers, one fixture manufacturers and  one professional lighting designer.  In addition, all eight of the photos in the article are taken during the day, so they're nice illustrations of the use of windows and daylight in residential interiors but terrible illustrations of electric lighting, which is the topic of the article.  They seem to  be marketing photos for particular lighting fixtures, not examples of good lighting.

Fixture Cost Frustration

At a project meeting yesterday a client expressed frustration with the caveats we place at the end of our lighting fixture budget. Why can’t we give the client a simple, accurate budget estimate?  

IES Releases Ready Reference App

For many years the IES Ready Reference was on the desk of every lighting designer, and we were all baffled when they stopped publishing it.  Great news, it's back!  This time as an app for your phone or tablet that's available in the Apple App Store and Google Play.  According to the IES, the app  provides:  
  • Core lighting knowledge, including values from illuminance tables
  • General knowledge information, assembled from The Lighting Handbook, 10th Edition and IES standards
  • Simple calculators for quick and easy basic lighting and energy and economic calculations
  • A search feature allowing you to find the information you want

Download it from the Apple App Store or Google Play.

Save EU Stage Lighting

The following is quoted from the April 20, 2018 issue of ESTA Standards Watch.

IES Lighting Terms and Definitions Now Online

ANSI/IES RP-16 Nomenclature and Definitions for Illuminating Engineering has long been one of the two major documents defining terms related to lighting design (the other is CIE ILV: International Lighting Vocabulary).  RP-16-10 (the 2010 version of the Recommended Practice) is now available online as a searchable database.  From the first page you can click on terms to see the definition and you can also search by keyword.  If you don't already own RP-16 bookmark this now!

On A Site Survey

Yesterday we surveyed a site in D.C. for a possible new Vapiano restaurant.  The NYC flagship renovation begins soon, and a new location opens in Chicago later this year, all with lighting design by Studio T+L.

LEDs In Stage Lighting

In a project meeting yesterday a team member said that LED stage lights would save the owner money.  While there are many reasons to include LED lights in a theatre's equipment inventory, cost savings is not one of them.  We've written a white paper, LEDs In Stage Lighting, that includes an economic analysis and simple rate of return.  Get a copy here.

Lenore Doxsee Lights John Jasperse

Our own Lenore Doxsee will be lighting "Remains" a new work by John Jasperse at BAM's Next Wave Festival this fall.  The dance piece will run from September 21 - 24 at the Harvey Theatre.  BAM describes the piece as "sampling fragments and phrases from the radical practices of his forbears while repurposing them within the contemporary present."

Why Hire A Designer?

We’ve had several people call this year to ask, “Why should I hire Studio T+L when the local sales rep/distributor has offered to do the work?” In one instance the caller was an interior designer we’ve worked with before who wanted help in explaining the role of a lighting designer to a client. In another, it was the client of an architect who was urging that we be brought on board as a theatre consultant. In all cases the owner was looking to save money, and saw adding another consultant to the design team as a potential waste of money. Nothing could be further from the truth.

What Happened to IYL?

Elizabeth Donoff asks "International Year of What?" in her editorial in this month's Architectural Lighting, and I have to agree with her.  Early last year I noted that our professional organizations showed no plans to take advantage of the International Year of Light, and indeed nothing worth mentioning happened.  The professional societies of the lighting community (IES, IALD, etc.) added the International Year of Light logo to their web sites, but that's about all.  They held no significant events, published no important documents, and made no efforts to raise the visibility of the profession with potential employers (architects and owners) or with the public at large.  The IALD boasts that their regularly scheduled events were added to the IYL calendar, but say nothing as to what resulted, probably because the result was nothing.  Lightfair 2015 was business as usual, I saw no recognition of IYL.

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